Posts Tagged ‘female’

041 How to Use What Comes Easy For You To Find Your Power with Val Romero

We tend to associate success with hard work. If we didn’t sweat for it, it doesn’t count. Unfortunately, that can sometimes result in us discrediting the successes we have that came easily. Perhaps we ought to change that attitude. If something comes easily to us, we ought to acknowledge that we have an intuitive ‘knack,’ and take advantage of it. For Women Make a Difference founder Val Romero, this struggle is very real. After working for years in finance and always viewing her people skills as just something that didn’t matter very much, she’s finally come to appreciate and benefit from those skills.

Today I speak with Val Romero, founder of Women Make a Difference. Women Make a Difference is a monthly luncheon meet-up developed to help women network and meet others in their community. Women Make a Difference has been hosting luncheons for over a decade and offers tech classes, a business directory, and services focused on increasing visibility and exposure for business owners. In 2015 Val was named a Woman of Influence Winner by Albuquerque Business First. Today I talk with Val about connecting with other women to get ahead, recognizing the strength in what comes easily to you, and learning how to network.

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What You’ll Discover in This Episode

  • Tips for starting up a conversation and making connections, even when you’re feeling out of your comfort zone

  • Why it is so important to be engaged with your female community and use each other as resources and sources of strength

  • How you can recognize your innate skills, and use them to help yourself and skill share with others

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More About Val

Before starting Women Make a Difference, Val worked in finance in bookkeeping and office assistant positions. In these positions she excelled because of her social skills; she was always chatting with clients and making connections. She didn’t give much credit to her social skills, thinking of them as just being an insignificant part of the job. Often if there’s something easy for us, we don’t count is as a value,” she reflects. It was only after years of friends and coworkers complimenting her networking skills that she began to consider doing something with this ability.

With Women Make a Difference, Val is able to utilize her social skills to help her career, as well as to help and train other women to grow in theirs. The foundation of Women Make a Difference is an emphasis on the importance of women helping one another. Val models this principle by showing other women how they can be social, network, and make authentic connections. She also urges women to own their innate skills. “When people are acknowledging you for things you’ve done that were easy,” take credit for them, she encourages. The decision to take ownership of her innate skills is how she ended up where she is today with Women Make a Difference. Seek strength from one another, she suggests, because we are all stronger together.

Describe one personal habit that contributes to your well-being:

Having a positive attitude.

What super power did you discover you had only to realize it was there all the time?

I’m easy to build rapport and trust with.

What advice would you give to your 25 or 30 year old self?

Set more boundaries and learn to say no.

Check Out the Links Mentioned in This Episode!

Women Make A Difference

Radical Beauty by Deepak Chopra

Selling With Intention by Ursula C. Mentjes

Crazy Rich Asians by Kevin Kwan

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031 Balancing Feminine Perspectives for Better Business with Halla Tomasdottir

In the corporate world, it’s less common for women to have high positions of power. This means that financial decisions are happening in a male-dominated space. Statistically speaking, male dominated spaces tend to present masculine modes of thinking, leaving out feminine contributions. According to Halla Tomasdottir, it is not merely more fair when feminine perspectives are present, but businesses are much more effective when there is a balance between the masculine and feminine ways of handling money.

Halla Tomasdottir is an Icelandic entrepreneur, a co-founder of Audur Capital and a key founder of Reykjavik University. Halla has worked for companies like M&M/Mars and Pepsi Cola and held the role of managing director and executive board member of the Iceland Chamber of Commerce. She has sector experience from consumer products, healthcare, education, media and mobile communication and financial services. Halla was recently a candidate for President of Iceland, of which she was runner-up. She received the Cartier Women’s Initiative Award for outstanding women entrepreneurs in Europe and in March 2011 Newsweek named Halla one of 150 Women Who Shake the World. Today I speak with Halla about why it is so important to have a balance between the masculine and feminine, in every aspect of our lives, what feminine perspectives are in the workplace, and how you can implement some of these gender balance practices in your own business.

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What You’ll Discover in This Episode

  • How you can implement a balanced feminine/masculine environment in your workplace for sustainability, happier employees, and greater success
  • Why balanced gender roles isn’t just more fair, it makes for better business practices
  • Specific recommendations for incorporating Halla’s ESG model (Environment, Social, and Governmental) into your business for more efficient, successful work

 

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More About Halla

Halla’s assertion that businesses would do better with a greater balance of masculine and feminine thinking isn’t just a notion; it’s been statistically proven. For example, when you include more women in corporate world, they tend to integrate a dedication to community and the people involved in a product rather than have the focus exclusively on shareholders. This small adjustment leads to happier employees, better performance, and an emphasis on sustainability rather than only output. As she puts it, “it’s not just a women’s rights issues, it’s an economic issue.”

For those new to the notion of a feminine and masculine , Halla describes simple ways to begin incorporating feminine modes of thinking into areas where they are currently lacking. She focuses on three areas where practices can be implemented; environment, sociological; and government. By incorporating policies that emphasize concern with governmental, social, and environmental issues, your company focus shifts to have concern for “health of the community,” and your business will more successful. In the simplest terms, when feminine perspectives are included in business there is a shift from focus on output to focus on community, and this shift actually leads to greater output and performance.

While Halla does identify as a feminist, she explains that her push for gender balance in business does “not come from a women’s rights standpoint.” She explains, “when women are empowered, the economy is empowered. Society is empowered. It’s about economic development and society development. It’s good for women and for the men.” Halla does not merely preach this doctrine, she exemplifies it in her in her business and life. Halla was recently ran in the Icelandic presidential race, where she was runner-up. “I’m convinced,” she says, “if we’re to build a world that makes sense and is sustainable in economic and social terms, we ‘re going to need more women.”

Check Out the Links Mentioned in This Episode!

Halla’s TedTalk

Halla on SistersCapitol.com

Background on the economic crash in Iceland and Halla’s work

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026: Conquering Fear with Fernanda Santos

In American media, there are stigmas associated with certain professions. Nurses are traditionally portrayed as women, firefighters are traditionally depicted as men, and reporters are native English speakers. For reporter Fernanda Santos, none of the usual stigmas ring true. As a Brazilian born reporter, Fernanda moved to the US when she was twenty-five to pursue writing. Eighteen years later, she is a staff writer for the New York Times, and has recently come out with a book about the lives, networks, and experiences of the Granite Mountain Hotshots.

Fernanda will assure you, her untraditional decisions were not easy ones to make. She has faced many times of dread, self-doubt, and questioning as she’s moved forward in her career as a journalist. Today I speak with Fernanda about the obstacles she had to overcome to get where she is today, how she came to use fear as a motivating tool rather than a ‘trap,’ and why her unique perspective is so useful in telling the stories of the fallen firefighters.

Get the FREE chapter of “The Fire Line” by Fernanda Santos

What You’ll Discover in This Episode:

  • What you can tell yourself when fear creeps up on you
  • Tips and secrets for beginning a massive project and seeing it through to completion
  • How to overcome doubts and insecurities when starting a new project
  • Fernanda’s advice for women seeking out nontraditional work

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More About Fernanda

Fernanda moved to the US from Brazil to pursue journalism when she was twenty-five. Growing up, her father had always told her that as a woman, she could “do exactly what a man could do, and [she] can do it better if [she] wants.” For Fernanda, this meant pursuing her dreams of becoming a successful journalist, which she has achieved successfully.

In her most recent endeavor, recounting the lives of the nineteen Hotshot firefighters who perished in the Yarnell Hill Fire in Prescott, AZ, Fernanda met a lot of obstacles; externally and from within herself. The lives of firefighters are usually excluded to a male voice, but Fernanda sought to explore the story from a female perspective. By using her unique narrative style she created a side of the story that perhaps would never have been shown, including an emphasis on the families and loved ones of those involved.

Fernanda feels that in a way the fact that she is a woman allowed her to become closer to her subjects. The partners, wives, and mothers of the firefighters were able to connect with her in a way they may not have with someone else. Fernanda recalls feeling that “there was a sense of ‘you understand what I’m talking about,’” as Fernanda is also a wife and mother.

Despite years of success, Fernanda still finds herself having moments of self-doubt or fear that she isn’t good enough. She’s learned to deal with fear by accepting it as a necessary part of her creative process, rather than something to be pushed away. In this way, she is able to accept it, examine it, and move past it without it burdening her down.

What super power did you discover you had only to realize it was there all the time?

The ability to juggle ten things at a time.

What advice would you give to your 25 or 30 year old self?

You don’t have to be like other people.

Check Out The Links Mentioned in This Episode!

The Fire Line: The Story of the Granite Mountain Hotshots and One of the Deadliest Days in American Firefighting

Fernanda’s Website

“What We Fear” Ted Talk

Get the FREE chapter of “The Fire Line” by Fernanda Santos

 

The free giveaway is excerpted from THE FIRE LINE: The Story of the Granite Mountain Hotshots and One of the Deadliest Days in American Firefighting. Copyright © 2016 by Fernanda Santos. Excerpted by permission of Flatiron Books, a division of Macmillan Publishers. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher. Available for purchase.

024 Relationship Building for Greater Success with Micaela Brown

As entrepreneurs, we have the tendency to look inward for career support, ideas, and decisions. Our businesses and ventures are our personal dreams and goals, and therefore we often feel that no one else can offer the kind of stamina, dedication, and commitment than we can provide. According to Inspire People Media founder Micaela Brown, the best ideas and support systems often come from entrepreneurs putting their heads together. When a handful of entrepreneurs are working on the same problem together, their combined efforts are inevitably more potent than the efforts of one mind.

Micaela is chief Inspiration Officer and owner of Inspire People Media, a New Mexico-based experiential and lifestyle people, media, marketing, and special events agency. Prior to starting IPM, Micaela was President of Heritage Productions LLC, CEO of Target Market International, LLC. Micaela was producer of the Santa Fe Foodie Classic, founder of Diner en Blanc Albuquerque, and producer of Christmas at Hogwarts. Today I speak with Micaela about using networking and support systems to get ahead, problem solving in groups, and recognizing when it is time to take a step back from your business commitments and focus on personal wellbeing.

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What You’ll Discover in This Episode:

  • How to use social media and other resources to develop a hugely successful event in a short period of time
  • When to say no to your business and focus on yourself, to have greater wellbeing and a stronger business.
  • How to throw an event that is unique, successful, and creates buzz about you and your brand
  • How to use your community and fellow entrepreneurs to skill share and problem solve, so everyone can get ahead

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More About Micaela

Micaela’s professional life began in politics, where she developed precise organizing, management, and multi-tasking skills. Finding success in her various pursuits, she turned to develop her own business. Today she has come to recognize that she has found her niche in consulting and marketing.

Micaela has worked both in startups, where you have to “crank it out” and as a manager of large teams. She has always been one to rely on herself for the answers, and seek help only when necessary. Currently, this means that she has independently launched her business in 1.5 months, hosted two successful events, has eighteen event concepts in the works, and runs seven facebook accounts, five instagram accounts, eight twitter accounts, three linkedin accounts, and six websites.

I met Micaela at a ‘fortuitous moment.’ Having dealt with a list of health issues over the past year as she’s been developing her business, she recognizes that she is pushing herself too hard. She explains that she has now “made a conscious decision that I need to learn that my business does not need to occupy every moment of my time.” While she has come to rely entirely upon herself, she understands that she cannot function efficiently when she has no help in any of her ventures.

This has recently translated in her development of a supportive group of women entrepreneurs in Albuquerque called the League of Extraordinary Women. In this group the members provide support to one another by offering free service in each of their unique skillsets. The womens’ backgrounds range from experience in banking, social media, and nonprofits to name a few, and they all come together to offer support to one another. The group also problem solves together, as “it takes a different type of mind to solve a problem than the one who created it.” For Micaela, the group is a step toward finding balance between independence and community, to function at her best.

What super power did you discover you had only to realize it was there all the time?

I can do a lot by myself; I’m self sufficient.

What advice would you give to your 25 or 30 year old self?

Don’t take things so seriously.

Check Out the Links Mentioned in This Episode!

Inspire People Media

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