Posts Tagged ‘education’

035 How to Find Inspiration in Life’s Biggest Challenges with Christine Glidden

We all face challenges and unexpected chaos. Whether we panic or step up, those moments ultimately inspire some sort of growth and change, as we have to adjust to the new circumstances to survive. Sometimes it’s the biggest challenges in life that lead us to step up, gather our strengths, and discover the inspiration to project our lives in a new and unexpected direction. For Christine Glidden, it was a cancer diagnosis that inspired her to embark on a journey to fight for women’s access to sanitary products, education, and opportunity. Today I speak with Christine about how her cancer diagnosis dramatically transformed her life, how she was able to find hope and inspiration after the diagnosis, and what she does today to impact the world.

Christine Glidden is the founder of Women To Be, a nonprofit that aims to provide women with limited resources with underwear and menstrual products, so they can be healthy and independent. Christine is a member of the Board of Trustees of the University of New Mexico Hospital and has worked as an Honorary Commander with Kirtland Air Force Base.  In 2015, Christine was awarded the Service Above Self award from the Rotary Club of Albuquerque. The award is given to people who exemplify the term “be a gift to the world.”

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What You’ll Discover in This Episode

How you can use Christine’s experience to overcome hardships in your own life, and use them as a source of strength

  • How you can contribute to Christine’s cause: getting feminine hygiene products to women that need them most

  • Christine’s tips and advice for people that want to make a difference in the world

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More About Christine

Prior to her cancer diagnosis, Christine worked happily in psychotherapy, a career she had maintained for thirty years. She was semiretired, regularly participated in triathlons, and had supportive friends and family around her. Looking back, Christine recognizes that she “was living the dream,” and was lucky to have the life that allowed her to take a break for treatment when she received the diagnosis. Though it was a shock to learn that she had breast cancer, Christine “decided consciously that breast cancer was going to be an inconvenience and not a problem. ” She says she “decided the only thing I was going to do during my treatment period was surround myself with people who made me happy and peaceful.”

After undergoing treatment, Christine felt changed. She “wanted to live a new dream.” The cancer diagnosis had given her a previously untapped drive to make a difference in the world on a large scale. She just didn’t know what that would be.

The answer came along in the form of a conversation with a friend. Christine’s friend, Duka, had lived in refugee camps in Nepal, and when she described the “desperate way of living,” particularly for girls and women, Christine knew what she could do to help. She says “in my heart I had this conviction that this is who I would be in the future” because of the project she was about to begin. Christine began organizing kits for women in Nepal refugee camps, which contain feminine hygiene products. These products help girls stay in school (as they won’t have to miss school because of infection caused by lack of sanitary products), delay having children for a few years, and develop skills, all of which have been shown to “boost a woman’s income by 20-25%.”

Today Christine’s idea has evolved into Women To Be, which has expanded its mission to help women in Nepal as well as Guatemala. Regarding her self-care, Christine explains that she takes it one day at a time. She encourages herself and others to “take a step [today] and promise yourself that tomorrow you’ll take the next one.”

Check Out the Links Mentioned in This Episode!

Women To Be 

Women To Be Facebook page

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031 Balancing Feminine Perspectives for Better Business with Halla Tomasdottir

In the corporate world, it’s less common for women to have high positions of power. This means that financial decisions are happening in a male-dominated space. Statistically speaking, male dominated spaces tend to present masculine modes of thinking, leaving out feminine contributions. According to Halla Tomasdottir, it is not merely more fair when feminine perspectives are present, but businesses are much more effective when there is a balance between the masculine and feminine ways of handling money.

Halla Tomasdottir is an Icelandic entrepreneur, a co-founder of Audur Capital and a key founder of Reykjavik University. Halla has worked for companies like M&M/Mars and Pepsi Cola and held the role of managing director and executive board member of the Iceland Chamber of Commerce. She has sector experience from consumer products, healthcare, education, media and mobile communication and financial services. Halla was recently a candidate for President of Iceland, of which she was runner-up. She received the Cartier Women’s Initiative Award for outstanding women entrepreneurs in Europe and in March 2011 Newsweek named Halla one of 150 Women Who Shake the World. Today I speak with Halla about why it is so important to have a balance between the masculine and feminine, in every aspect of our lives, what feminine perspectives are in the workplace, and how you can implement some of these gender balance practices in your own business.

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What You’ll Discover in This Episode

  • How you can implement a balanced feminine/masculine environment in your workplace for sustainability, happier employees, and greater success
  • Why balanced gender roles isn’t just more fair, it makes for better business practices
  • Specific recommendations for incorporating Halla’s ESG model (Environment, Social, and Governmental) into your business for more efficient, successful work

 

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More About Halla

Halla’s assertion that businesses would do better with a greater balance of masculine and feminine thinking isn’t just a notion; it’s been statistically proven. For example, when you include more women in corporate world, they tend to integrate a dedication to community and the people involved in a product rather than have the focus exclusively on shareholders. This small adjustment leads to happier employees, better performance, and an emphasis on sustainability rather than only output. As she puts it, “it’s not just a women’s rights issues, it’s an economic issue.”

For those new to the notion of a feminine and masculine , Halla describes simple ways to begin incorporating feminine modes of thinking into areas where they are currently lacking. She focuses on three areas where practices can be implemented; environment, sociological; and government. By incorporating policies that emphasize concern with governmental, social, and environmental issues, your company focus shifts to have concern for “health of the community,” and your business will more successful. In the simplest terms, when feminine perspectives are included in business there is a shift from focus on output to focus on community, and this shift actually leads to greater output and performance.

While Halla does identify as a feminist, she explains that her push for gender balance in business does “not come from a women’s rights standpoint.” She explains, “when women are empowered, the economy is empowered. Society is empowered. It’s about economic development and society development. It’s good for women and for the men.” Halla does not merely preach this doctrine, she exemplifies it in her in her business and life. Halla was recently ran in the Icelandic presidential race, where she was runner-up. “I’m convinced,” she says, “if we’re to build a world that makes sense and is sustainable in economic and social terms, we ‘re going to need more women.”

Check Out the Links Mentioned in This Episode!

Halla’s TedTalk

Halla on SistersCapitol.com

Background on the economic crash in Iceland and Halla’s work

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025 Discover The Secret Power of Mentorship with Myra Travin

While most educational settings are defined by the traditional classroom model, this isn’t the only modem of learning. Perhaps you learn better with auditory stimulation, learning by doing, or one-on-one training. The reality is that few of us naturally do our best in the traditional learning environment, but unfortunately that is essentially the only learning model that is offered, both in academic and business training settings.

According to Myra Travin, many individuals as well as large-scale businesses would be much more successful if they adopted a mentorship model. To Myra, this is a more female way of learning. Since men dominate so many business sectors, this female inspired mentor-mentee learning approach is rarely implemented.

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Today I speak with Myra Travin, author of “School of You: Stop the Overload, Become a Guerrilla Learner and Change Your Life,” LX designer and technical coach, assisting organizations to be more resilient, creative, and supportive of the teams they are promoted to manage. Myra recently spoke at South by Southwest and will soon be presenting at the ICF Prism Awards about technical coaching: the Flow-Shift model. Today I talk with Myra about the benefits of coaching, how a woman’s intuitive perspective can aid companies in achieving success, and how she envisions the future of artificial intelligence.

What You’ll Discover in This Episode

  • How a mentor will benefit you and help you achieve your goals
  • How you can use your strengths as a woman to advance your business, entrepreneurial goals, or the company for whom you work
  • The right mentor ‘fit’ for you and how you can find her or him
  • What you as a woman can bring to a company or startup that would otherwise be lacking

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More About Myra

Myra calls herself an “Educational Futurist.” This means she believes that as we develop artificial intelligence, education, mentorship, and connection will become integral to our functioning with this new intelligence. This emphasis on relational learning is at the core of her work. Myra views her path to be to find ways to include the female inclination toward relational learning and teaching into the tech world. And she is a unique voice in the tech industry. Women are highly underrepresented in startups, and Myra believes this is to the detriment of the tech industry as “women have something that is essential for the success of an organization.” She suggests that women have a very humanistic way of looking at the world, and her tech work attests to this.

Taking this concept to a more personalized level, Myra believes that education model would benefit from a more female, relationship transformation. Currently, large companies tend to value individual contributions and attainment of money, rather than valuing all employees and encouraging a sense of connectedness. This also hinders the possible development of mentor/mentee relationships, leading overall to less satisfaction in the workplace and failure to maintain employee retention. Myra feels that these issues could be overcome if we can teach the tech world and companies to value women’s contributions. The economy would expand in ways not previously seen and we would all benefit, in our jobs and in our general life satisfaction.

Describe one personal habit that contributes to your well-being:

I try to do the next best thing; take it day by day.

What super power did you discover you had only to realize it was there all the time?

Resilience and intuition.

What advice would you give to your 25 or 30 year old self?

Fasten your seatbelt, it’s going to be a hilarious ride. You can’t imagine. Surf on top of change. Chill and enjoy the ride.

Check Out The Links Mentioned in This Episode!

School of You: Stop the Overload, Become a Guerrilla Learner and Change Your Life

International Coach Federation

Myra at South by Southwest

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020 Forgiveness as a Tool for Self Care with Carolyn Tadamala

When people harm us, hurt us or sabotage us in some way, we often jump to anger and revenge. How can I get back at them? How can I gain back the power or status that they stole? According to entrepreneur Carolyn Tadamala, forgiveness is the answer. By forgiving them for their attacks, you allow yourself to take lessons form the incident and grow, rather than stagnantly dwelling on angry emotions and using your energy in petty, nonproductive ways. This tactic, Carolyn explains, is particularly useful when the failure was the result of your own actions. Imagine how much time and energy you would save if you simply forgave yourself for your mistakes, rather than wasting time suffering over them?

Today I chat with Carolyn Tadamala, India-based entrepreneur and founder of Éclair Patisserie, a bakery in Hyderabad. 90% of the profits of Éclair Patisserie go toward finding education for impoverished children and covering medical bills for children who are fighting cancer. Carolyn and I talk about incorporating family into your business, surrounding yourself with supportive people (and cutting out those that bring you down), burn out, and how to use forgiveness as a tool for self care.

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What You’ll Discover in This Episode:

  • How you can surround yourself with the people that support you and cut out those that bring you down
  • Tips for handling and avoiding burnout
  • How you can involve your family in your business and inspire them to support and love it
  • How to move on when you’re angry with yourself or a coworker

More About Carolyn

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Carolyn’s café, Éclair Patisarrie, is evidence of the growth she has had throughout her adulthood. She recalls a time earlier in her life when she was miserable to those around her, and as a result attracted miserable people. Carolyn made a decision to improve herself and to improve her surroundings, removing herself from people that hurt her or brought her down while at the same time working on herself to make sure she was treating herself and her loved ones kindly.

Improving the lives of those around her has become a central focus for Carolyn, in her work raising money for impoverished children, and in her personal life. While many of us struggle to care for the wellbeing of our family and the success of our business, Carolyn does the two together. From the very beginning she has included her family in the decisions around her business, finding that “Once they felt they were a part of it, it was easier for them to be accepting of the hard parts.”

Today I caught Carolyn at a pivotal moment; she was on the brink of burnout. She had been traveling, not getting enough sleep or exercise, and simply dealing with too much on her plate. In these moments Carolyn “jumps out.” She puts all of her responsibilities to the side and remembers her own self-care. She prioritizes rest, healthy diet, and exercise, and she asks herself a series of questions. “Who am I? What do I want to do? What do I need to get rid of to get to what I want? Who do I need to forgive?” By remembering the answers to these questions she is able to put herself back on track, and by offering forgiveness to herself and those around her she’s able to move forward and “jump back in.”

What super power did you discover you had only to realize it was there all the time?

Happiness.

What advice would you give to your 25 or 30 year old self?

Don’t worry. It’s all going to work out.

Check Out The Links Mentioned in This Episode!

Éclair Cafe

The Magic of Thinking Big by David J. Shwartz

The Law of Attraction by Esther Hicks

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014 Compassion as a Means for Change with LaDonna Harris

In business and life, we inevitably will meet someone with whom we butt heads. Whether it’s an issue of personality clash, differences in political opinion, or different viewpoints on an issue, not everyone is going to agree with your views. While you many never get someone to change their opinion, it’s important to remember that closed-minded beliefs are, at the core, a matter of lack of education. Someone is not attacking you because they are right, they simply do not know better. While this isn’t always the most comforting reality, it may be the best starting point to move forward. According to LaDonna Harris, President of Americans for Indian Opportunity, this can be the most productive place to begin a conversation, as your emotions are not tied up in the discussion and you can begin to educate, rather than fight.

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LaDonna Harris has been a central voice for Native American rights, civil rights, environmental protection, and the women’s movement. She founded some of today’s leading national Native American organizations including Oklahomans for Indian Opportunity, the National Indian Housing Council, Council of Energy Resource Tribes, National Tribal Environmental Council, and National Indian Business Association. LaDonna also worked to enact civil rights changes and was a founder of the National Women’s Political Caucus. Today I speak with LaDonna about finding her voice, discovering productive ways to work with adversaries, organizing groups for social change and overcoming stereotypes.

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What You’ll Discover in This Episode:

  • How you can deal with adversaries and create a relationship with them that benefits you both
  • Tips for finding your voice when it feels like no one wants to listen
  • How you can bring individuals together in the workplace or elsewhere to way to make real, significant change
  • How to voice your experience in a way that makes it relatable and can influence the opinion of those with differing views

More About LaDonna

LaDonna was raised by her Great-Grandparents in rural Oklahoma during the Great Depression. Growing up in Comanche culture, family, community, and connectedness were essential principles in LaDonna’s upbringing. This emphasis on connectedness has been a driving force in LaDonna’s organizing work, and has allowed her to keep a calm head when faced with prejudice and opposition.

LaDonna’s public service work began alongside her husband at the time, U.S. Senator Fred Harris. LaDonna is very skilled as reading people, and used this talent when she would join her husband in Congressional hearings. This allowed her to quickly discern some of the serious problems that were occurring in America at the time, such as inequities for women, people of color, and Native Americans.

Initially LaDonna struggled with voicing her opinions when she was met with these issues. She would find herself filled with frustration, and often tears, and fall silent. Overtime LaDonna learned that she could find success in initiating change if she focused on interconnectedness and sought to educate and organize rather than fight. She would act by joining communities together to fight for change, as well as working to integrate tribal governments and ways of life into the Federal system.

During this time LaDonna discovered one of her greatest strengths; organizing people around an issue. LaDonna views success as the ability to create something and then let it go; she emphasizes helping to bring people together around an issue that effects them, and then letting them take over. While this may sound incredibly generous, LaDonna chooses to see her work with others as selfish. She thrives on human interaction, so to her helping others is helping herself.

Describe one personal habit that contributes to your well-being:

Working with other people.

What super power did you discover you had only to realize it was there all the time?

Being able to organize people.

What advice would you give to your 25 or 30 year old self?

Follow the Comanche principle that everyone has value.

 

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Check Out the Links Mentioned in This Episode!

Americans for Indian Opportunity

Indian 101

Native American Indian Housing Counsel

National Indian Business Association

National Women’s Political Caucus